MTA Real Estate

Current Retail Opportunities

The MTA is looking for innovative retail partners who can deliver world-class experiences for our riders. This is an opportunity to get an exclusive location, exposing your business to hundreds of thousands of riders a year. 

Telecommunications and Utilities

The MTA's rights-of-way and other properties can provide a route or location for telecommunications and other utility installations that provide services to our customers and communities throughout our operating area. The MTA works with private and public sector organizations to allow such installations on MTA properties. To explore opportunities to install new or use existing conduits and ducts, or install equipment such as towers, antennas, and ground-based facilities for wireless communications, contact us using the information below. 

Contact MTA Real Estate

Real Estate Department
Metropolitan Transportation Authority
2 Broadway, 4th floor
New York, New York 10004

Telephone: (212) 878-7049

EmailMTARE@mtahq.org

Grand Central Terminal

A photo of a market inside grand central terminal. Vendor booths stretch down both sides of a long aisle. Each one has small groups of people in front of it. A blond woman walks away from the camera.

With over 500,000 visitors every day, the MTA's Grand Central Terminal is a major New York City destination for transportation, shopping, dining, fresh food, public events, and entertainment. The terminal houses more than 90 retail operations, including restaurants, stores, and food shops. Vanderbilt Hall, situated adjacent to the Main Concourse of Grand Central, is a spectacular setting for special public and private events including corporate functions, benefits, and exhibits. Learn more about events, event planning, and sponsorship at Grand Central Terminal.

Getting Permission to Use MTA Property

Our staff can help you determine what property is controlled by the MTA and, if necessary, help you obtain the necessary license or permit and requirements for insurance. You can start your research by getting a tax map from your municipality and locating the county/borough, block, and lot number of the property in which you are interested. Please send us this information, along with the proposed use, how long you wish to use the property, and, if possible, a map.

Station Naming Rights

The MTA will consider selling naming rights to a station as long as the new name does make it harder for our riders to navigate the system. We only consider potential sponsors with a unique or iconic connection to a station that would be obvious to typical MTA customers. These policies are set out in our All-Agency Naming Rights Policy

If a naming request meets our guidelines, we use an independent consulting firm to determine the fair market value of the opportunity. The MTA Board needs to formally approve all station name changes. 

The sponsor handles all costs related to the renaming, including (but not limited to):

  • Station signage, including tiles,
  • Changes or modifications of on-board announcements, and
  • Changes to MTA-created maps and other informational material.

Requests for information and renaming should be made in writing and addressed to the MTA Director of Real Estate.  

Forms

Forms you may need as part of the MTA Real Estate Process.